Lorna Sass interview 2010: Part I

Nationally-known cookbook author and food writer Lorna Sass interviewed me on Feb. 21, 2010. See Part I, Part II, and Part III.

In the first video (above), I’m wearing one of my handwoven tunics. I explain what the word “permaculture” means. I list some of the cool season crops that grow well at high elevation. Then, I touch on the history of farming in Flagstaff. I also explain the importance of composting and talks about the challenges of large-scale composting. Finally, I discuss my sustainable living ethic and how this plays out in my daily life.

Milk & cookies!

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Organic, homemade soy milk and peppermint chocolate chip soy okara cookies made with freshly ground whole wheat flour, that is.

Sourdough pizza with mock tomato sauce: Part I

Part I: Making the pizza sauce

Adapted from The Natural Canning Resource Book: A guide to home canning with locally-grown, sustainably-produced and fair-trade foods and Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains: A guide to high-altitude, semi-arid home permaculture gardens:

Tomatoes are a summer and early fall crop. It’s easy to home can tomato paste and tomato sauce, of course, but you can also try mock tomato sauce, a winter vegetable pizza sauce alternative to tomatoes. Beets and winter squash are excellent root cellar vegetables; choose good “keeping” varieties with tougher skins if you are growing your own for long term storage. Beets and squash can also be home canned safely in diced form only (thick low acid purees cannot be pressure canned safely at home).

Beets and deep orange winter squash are also more nutritious than tomato sauce. According to the Web site NutritionData.self.com, an ounce of ordinary pizza sauce has 1/3 as much fiber as either 1 oz beets or 1 oz squash. Pizza sauce typically has no vitamin A or C while an ounce of squash provides 29% of daily recommended Vitamin A and 4% of recommended vitamin C. Beets and deep orange winter squash (and pumpkin, which is winter squash) are high in nitrates. Nitrates (as opposed to unhealthy nitrites) boost nitric oxide in your blood, which dilates blood vessels, improving blood and oxygen flow to muscles and extremities. This also lowers blood pressure. (Dark leafy green vegetables are higher in nitrates than beets, a good reason to add beet greens, broccoli, kale, collards, etc. on top).

When I first made pizza with mock tomato sauce years ago, I didn’t tell Dan the sauce was different. He thought he hated beets, like a lot of people. I figured I’d let him eat the pizza first, see how he reacted, or if he even noticed, and then tell him what he ate. He LOVED the pizza. He kept going back for more, for a total of three slices. He kept saying, “this pizza is really good, but why is the sauce so pink?” When he found out that he had been eating beets, he was pleasantly surprised.

Solar cooking in cold winter climates

Solar cooking is an option year-round in sunny climates, even here at 7,000 feet elevation. The daytime highs have been barely above freezing, but that doesn’t matter. Air temperature has almost nothing to do with the temperature inside a solar cooker. Solar cookers are insulated. But more importantly, cooking temperatures are related to the strength of the sunlight. Clear skies = higher cooker temperatures. Snow on the ground raises cooker temperatures because snow reflects additional sunlight into the cooker! It’s even possible to solar cook at 58° north latitude in southern Norway. Solar cooking is also practiced in such high latitude places as Minnesota in January and Ontario, Canada.

This past week on a cold sunny day, I opened the solar oven at 9:45. The temperature outside was barely 30ºF. I accidentally left the oven door latch stuck in the door, so the oven door was propped open 1/8-inch, yet the oven had still managed to reach 200ºF one hour later. I put the squash in the cooker fiver minutes later, closed the oven door properly, and set the kitchen timer for 45 minutes. When the timer went off, the oven was 250ºF. I added three whole beets to the black granite ware roaster pot.

Clouds had moved in, making the sky partly cloudy, so I figured the cooking time would be longer than the one additional hour I had anticipated. Even so, the highest oven temperature reached was 325ºF. pretty good for a day that barely rose above freezing. I took the roaster out of the oven at 1:45 p.m. The beets and squash were meltingly soft.

To make the sauce, I puréed one beet with all the squash in my 40-year-old blender with a little lemon juice for acidity, to make the sauce even more like tomato sauce, and to help the blender make the purée. I sautéed whole fennel seeds and minced garlic as usual, added the beet-squash sauce and my other usual pizza herbs and spices. I put the other two beets in the freezer (you can’t buy just one beet). The recipe is included in my The Sunny Side of Cooking solar cookbook.

It’s also possible to cook pizza sauce in a solar cooker.

See Part II here.

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Solar cookers can cook anything

Adapted from The Sunny Side of Cooking: Solar cooking and other ecologically friendly cooking methods for the 21st century:

It is possible to use a solar cooker for everything from simmering to blanching, poaching, steaming, sautéing, braising, baking, roasting, toasting, grilling, barbecuing and pan frying. Most of these methods can be done in a box cooker. A few require the extra high temperatures only achievable with a parabolic reflector.

The foods above include chocolate tofu pie with a gluten free almond crust, baked kabocha squash, barbecued tempeh made with home canned barbecue sauce, minestrone soup with beans precooked in the solar oven, steamed corn on the cob, home grown rhubarb crumble, and whole wheat sourdough raisin bread. Enter “raynersolar” into my “Search Lisa’s Blog“ search box to see all of my original solar cooking blog posts (not reblogs). Use my Google search box to look up specific foods and dishes.

www.LisaRayner.com
www.amazon.com/author/lisarayner
www.etsy.com/shop/LifeweaverLLC

Nov. 18, 2015

Homemade tomato salsa with fresh roasted New Mexican green chiles

See my detailed posts from last year on canning homemade salsa with roasted chiles.

The Natural Resource Canning Book Cover

The Natural Canning Resource Book – A guide to home canning with locally-grown, sustainably-produced and fair trade foods

www.LisaRayner.com
www.amazon.com/author/lisarayner

Reheating leftovers in my solar cooker

I re-heated leftovers for lunch in my solar cooker: quinoa with home grown zucchini, eggplant grown by a local farmer that I purchased at from the Flagstaff Community Market, and scrambled tofu.

Imagine if your school or workplace had a solar cooker for people to use during the day. Solar cookers can cook any food. It is possible to use a solar cooker for everything from simmering to blanching, poaching, steaming, sautéing, braising, baking, roasting, toasting, grilling and pan frying.

Adapted from The Sunny Side of Cooking: Solar cooking and other ecologically friendly cooking methods for the 21st century.

The Flagstaff Eastside Community Market

Colorful locally grown vegetables at the Flagstaff Eastside Community Market. I prefer this Wednesday market to the downtown one because it takes place in the late afternoon instead of in the morning. I bought some of Hernandez Farm’s super fresh broccoli and eggplants, two of my favorite vegetables.

Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains 4th Edition Book Cover Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains: A Guide to high-altitude, semi-arid home permaculture garden