Kindle edition of Wild Bread now available!

My book, “Wild Bread: Handbaked sourdough artisan breads in your own kitchen” is now available on Kindle. Amazon is supposed to link the Kindle edition to the paper edition within the next 48 hours. You can buy the spiral-bound paper version here.

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Kneading sourdough bread dough is easy!

 

In this three-minute silent video, Lisa Rayner, author of “Wild Bread – Handbaked Sourdough Artisan Breads in Your Own Kitchen,” demonstrates how to knead the dough for whole wheat sourdough bread. Visit AmazonĀ to purchase my new Kindle version. The link below takes you to the paper version. Use my index and search box below left to look up sourdough blog posts.

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A Wild Bread cook book fan makes sourdough whole wheat & rice bread loaves

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Santa Fe resident, vegan, and bicycling advocate Jackie Shane baked these sourdough whole wheat/rice bread loaves and took their picture. She says, “Got the idea from Sandor Katz author of Wild Fermentation, and the awesome starter from Lisa Rayner, who authored Wild Bread.”

Wild Bread: Handbaked sourdough artisan breads in your own kitchen

Wild Bread Book

A rainy baking day in Santa Fe

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What I’ve been doing today: I baked whole wheat loaf bread, flatbread and peppermint chocolate chip okara cookies with flour I ground by hand this morning.

A sunny, warm spring day at 7,000 feet

Well, a few days from the start of spring. I solar cooked some long grain brown rice with turmeric to eat with stir-fry leftovers. Afternoon temperatures have been in the mid-60s, so I’m putting the fig tree on the balcony for a few hours every day. I also baked another loaf of whole wheat bread and soaked soy beans for making soy milk in the evening.

Saturday bread baking

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Another sourdough loaf made with 100% hand ground whole wheat flour, plus water and sourdough starter. That’s it! Eating my freshly baked bread is always wonderful.

A big cooking day at the urban homestead

Normally, my cooking and baking is spread out throughout the week. I bake two loaves of bread and one batch of cookies a week, and make two batches of soy milk and two dinners with leftovers each week. Sometimes, however, there is a confluence of events and I have a day spent largely cooking and baking. I had to bake a loaf of my 100% whole bread for myself, make milk, make cookies, and cook a pot of chili for dinner. I had spent an hour the day before grinding flour so I wouldn’t have to grind flour on baking day. I’ve been using a cup of whole wheat flour in my cookies lately, so I ground extra for that purpose.

I solar cooked pinto beans with dried whole red chiles I grew on my south facing balcony. Recently, I bought a copy of the new book The Homemade Vegan Pantry, which provides homemade alternatives to commercial staples like milk, cream, butter, bacon (really) and much, much more. I learned that the beany flavor of homemade soy milk can be removed by quick-soaking the beans by pouring boiling water over them and letting them sit for as little as an hour, rather than letting the soak in cool water for eight hours. I tried it; it does work as the author says but we are so used to our homemade soy milk that it didn’t really make a significant difference in taste to us. I will probably only use the quick-soaking method when we forget to soak the beans overnight or in the morning to make milk in the evening.

I made the milk, strained out the okara (Japanese word for soy pulp) and let it cool in the refrigerator, then baked my loaf of bread. I ran some errands on foot during the afternoon. In the evening, I baked my peppermint chocolate chip okara cookies and added the beans to a pot of vegan chili with diced tomatoes, corn, and fresh cilantro. The next day, Dan packaged some of the chili into individual serving portions and put the bags in the freezer.