Kindle edition of Wild Bread now available!

My book, “Wild Bread: Handbaked sourdough artisan breads in your own kitchen” is now available on Kindle. Amazon is supposed to link the Kindle edition to the paper edition within the next 48 hours. You can buy the spiral-bound paper version here.

Solar baked sourdough artisan rolls

I made a little extra whole wheat artisan dough (flour, water, sourdough starter) when I made a loaf of bread; sourdough starter is very flexible. After the bench rest, I used my bench knife to cut the dough into 12 pieces (I ran out of freshly ground flour and used unbleached flour for this part). I moistened my hands and carefully handled each roll, adding some olive oil to keep in the moisture in my arid climate. After letting the rolls rise, I baked them in my solar cooker with a black cover to help soak up additional sunlight. During the last third of baking, I removed the cover to lightly brown the crust and make it crunchy, like artisan rolls, rather than soft and fluffy like solar pull-apart rolls.

Adapted from Wild Bread: Handbaked sourdough artisan breads in your own kitchen and The Sunny Side of Cooking: Solar cooking and other ecologically friendly cooking methods for the 21st century.

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Sourdough sweet doughs

Sweet doughs contain sweetener and fat. They have a softer crumb than artisan breads and often include fillings and toppings. And yes, you can make excellent sweet doughs with sourdough starter whole wheat or other whole grains.

Other posts in this series:

Doughnuts are also sweet doughs. Look up “solar bread” or any other type of bread in my search box to find even more posts, dated earlier and later than this post.

Photo of cover of Wild Bread book small

 

Sourdough flatbreads, baked on oven tiles or on the stove top

 Sourdough flatbreads were the world’s first breads and continue to be highly popular. They are made from artisan doughs, sweet doughs, no-knead batters, and can contain fillings and toppings. From pizza to pancakes, flatbreads are eternally popular and especially easy to make. Here are some blog posts I have done on sourdough flatbread recipes:

Other posts in this series:

Look up “solar bread” or any other type of bread in my search box to find even more posts, dated earlier and later than this post.

Photo of cover of Wild Bread book small

 

Sourdough artisan breads

Artisan dough is a simple formula of active sourdough starter, flour, salt, and water. Artisan breads are baked without a pan to help shape them directly on ceramic tiles, bricks, cob or adobe. In addition to the rich sourdough flavors, free-standing artisan loaves baked at 500°F or more have additional depth of flavor and smell that isn’t present in loaf breads due to the chemical reactions that take place during the crust browning process, most importantly the Maillard reaction between amino acids (in the wheat protein) and naturally-occurring sugars.

Here are links to sourdough loaf bread posts I’ve done. Details are in my book Wild Bread: Handbaked sourdough artisan breads in your own kitchen:

Other posts in this series:

Look up “solar bread” or any other type of bread in my search box to find even more posts, dated earlier and later than this post.

Photo of cover of Wild Bread book small

 

Make your own sourdough loaf breads!

ANY bread can be made with a sourdough starter instead of commercial yeast. Sourdough loaf bread is one of the easiest breads to make. You can use plain flour/water/starter (artisan dough) or sweet dough containing sugar and fat. You can flavor loaf breads in multiple ways. You can bake your dough in a loaf pan of any shape, like the super long loaf bread pictured above. You can even bake sourdough batter in a loaf pan to make no-knead sliced bread!

Details are in my book Wild Bread: Handbaked sourdough artisan breads in your own kitchen:

Other posts in this series:

Look up “solar bread” or any other type of bread in my search box to find even more posts, dated earlier and later than this post.

Photo of cover of Wild Bread book small

 

Solar sourdough whole wheat pancakes with home canned jam

Adapted from Wild Bread: Handbaked sourdough artisan breads in your own kitchen and The Sunny Side of Cooking: Solar cooking and other ecologically friendly cooking methods for the 21st century:

When I woke up I opened up the solar cooker and placed an oiled cast iron griddle inside the cooker to preheat along with the oven itself. This step is no necessary, but it does speed up the cooking time and lightly brown the bottom of the pancakes. As you can see in the bottom photo, the bottom side of the pancake on the right, which is bottom up, is darker than the slice of pancake on the left, which shows the top of the pancake.

I used 10 oz of active sourdough starter for this pancake. Just as I do when cooking sourdough pancakes on a stovetop griddle I added some melted Earth Balance (vegan butter), homemade soymilk, evaporated cane juice (unbleached sugar), plus enough hand ground whole wheat flour to create a good batter consistency. I put the bowl outside next to the solar cooker to warm in the sun (during this hot time of year we keep the windows open at night to cool down the house so it was rather cool inside the house). The top photo shows the batter just after I poured it into the griddle. I could hear the bottom of the pancake sizzling just as if I was cooking it on a stovetop griddle.

If you have a large box cooker you can pour 4–6 individual pancakes on greased baking sheet. Otherwise, make one big pancake like I did in a griddle, 9-inch pie pan or 3-liter granite ware roaster. Cover with a dark lid and bake 30 minutes for smaller pancakes or 1 + hours for a single large pancake.