Lorna sass Interview 2010: Part II

Nationally-known cookbook author and food writer Lorna Sass interviewed me on Feb. 21, 2010. See Part I, Part II, and Part III.

I’m wearing one of my handwoven tunics. In this second video I talk about how I became a vegetarian in college. I later interned for Farm Sanctuary taking undercover videos in Pennsylvania stockyards. Watching the horrific abuse made me a vegan. I also talk about my early effort to write a cookbook based on foods that grow well at high elevation. Finding a word-processor in a dumpster was a big help to creating the first edition of my book, Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains (now in its fourth edition). I also discuss how I became interested in baking sourdough bread. I explain the feeding schedule for my sourdough starter and show off my Lehman’s grain grinder

…… Mmmmmm fresh bread ……

Flatbread is the most flavorful kind of sourdough. That’s because there is a high crust-to-bread ratio. It’s also fast to bake. When the sourdough culture has been fed flour and water several times and is ready for baking, I first save 8 oz of the culture in it’s storage jar, feed it more flour and water, and let it sit on the countertop for an hour. Then I add salt, water and my hand ground whole wheat flour to the dough and knead for about five minutes. When I make flatbread, I give the dough a bench rest to relax the gluten. Then I flatten it out and moisten the top with olive oil using wet hands. To prevent pita pockets from forming I use my Uzbeki bread stamp to poke holes in the dough after it has risen and bake the bread. My Kindle edition of “Wild Bread” is only $9.99. Also, I now have a YouTube channel. More free videos forthcoming!

A Wild Bread cook book fan makes sourdough whole wheat & rice bread loaves

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Santa Fe resident, vegan, and bicycling advocate Jackie Shane baked these sourdough whole wheat/rice bread loaves and took their picture. She says, “Got the idea from Sandor Katz author of Wild Fermentation, and the awesome starter from Lisa Rayner, who authored Wild Bread.”

Wild Bread: Handbaked sourdough artisan breads in your own kitchen

Wild Bread Book

A sunny, warm spring day at 7,000 feet

Well, a few days from the start of spring. I solar cooked some long grain brown rice with turmeric to eat with stir-fry leftovers. Afternoon temperatures have been in the mid-60s, so I’m putting the fig tree on the balcony for a few hours every day. I also baked another loaf of whole wheat bread and soaked soy beans for making soy milk in the evening.

Baking my weekly loaves of sourdough bread on a stormy day.

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Active, bubbling sourdough starter, also known as a sourdough culture

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You can tell just by looking whether or not a sourdough starter is healthy. Sourdough cultures are ecosystems composed of multiple species of wild yeast and lactic acid-producing bacteria living together in a mix of flour and water. The microbes live  together in symbiotic polycultures like plants, animals, fungi, and microbes do in larger wild ecosystems and permaculture garden guilds. Optimally, feed and use sourdough starter at the peak of its leavening activity.

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www.LisaRayner.com
www.amazon.com/author/lisarayner

A loaf of cracked grain caraway sourdough

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Making a loaf of cracked grain caraway sourdough with freshly ground whole wheat flour in the coolness of my shaded house. The olive oil is for oiling the bread pan before dusting semolina on it.

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www.LisaRayner.com
www.amazon.com/author/lisarayner