Lorna Sass interview: Part III

Nationally-known cookbook author and food writer Lorna Sass interviewed me on Feb. 21, 2010. See Part I, Part II, and Part III.

I’m wearing one of my handwoven tunics. In this third video, I display my solar cooker and talk about cooking times under various weather conditions. I also explains how my pressure cooker, in conjunction with my insulated box cooker, can be used to save energy even when the weather does not allow me to use her solar cooker. I also talk about writing my home canning book, The Natural Canning Resource Book.

Lorna Sass interview 2010: Part I

Nationally-known cookbook author and food writer Lorna Sass interviewed me on Feb. 21, 2010. See Part I, Part II, and Part III.

In the first video (above), I’m wearing one of my handwoven tunics. I explain what the word “permaculture” means. I list some of the cool season crops that grow well at high elevation. Then, I touch on the history of farming in Flagstaff. I also explain the importance of composting and talks about the challenges of large-scale composting. Finally, I discuss my sustainable living ethic and how this plays out in my daily life.

New Facebook page & Kindle edition for Wild Bread sourdough cookbook

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I have created a Facebook page with the help of my printer. I’m publishing a Kindle version of the paper book very soon. Check back for details.

Making & canning peach jam safely

Lisa makes her own peach jam while demonstrating some of the basics of water bath canning in this four-minute video. Video is silent but includes some descriptive text. Lisa Rayner is the author of “The Natural Canning Resource Book – A guide to home canning with locally-grown sustainably-produced and fair-trade foods.” This video is not meant to be a complete lesson in home canning. Canning can be fun but it can also be dangerous if not done correctly. Please educate yourself properly about canning before attempting to can your own food.

The Natural Resource Canning Book Cover

Boiling pinto beans in a solar cooker

Yes, solar cookers really do get hot and cook food! My Sun Oven reaches 350°F easily. The boiling point at sea level is 212°F. The boiling point at 7,000 feet elevation is 199°F.

Sunny Side of Cooking Book Cover

I grind my own whole wheat flour

Fresh flour tastes sweet. Wheat germ oil goes rancid quickly. Store whole grain flour in the freezer.

Photo of cover of Wild Bread book small

My newest book is about weaving

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When I’m not baking, cooking and gardening, I’m often weaving. I have published a 20-page, full-color booklet as both an instant digital download ebook and as a printed booklet called The Mermaid Scarf Pattern & the Freeform Overshot Technique. The booklet is for sale in my Etsy shop.  I wove my Mermaid Scarf on my 25-inch-wide Schacht Flip rigid heddle loom. Handwoven magazine published my short article on my Mermaid Scarf and put the scarf on the magazine cover of the Nov./Dec. 2015 issue.

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From my booklet: Do you wish you could weave fabric with complex Jacquard-like patterns? Do you like tapestry motifs, but want to weave wearable, drapeable cloth? You can weave such fabrics on any loom, from rigid heddle looms, backstrap looms, and even full size inkle looms, to simple shaft looms, multishaft table and floor looms, and dobby looms using the freeform overshot technique.

This booklet contains:

  • Close-up photographs of the back of my Mermaid Scarf showing design detail.

  • A description of my creative process and reinventing freeform overshot.

  • A detailed, easy-to-follow description of how to weave a Mermaid-style scarf.

  • Excerpts and photographs from blog posts I wrote while I was weaving the scarf.

  • Directions on how to apply the freeform overshot technique to any weaving project.

  • Photographs of freeform overshot scarves and comments from five other weavers.

  • How to use weaving software to design freeform overshot patterns.

  • How to weave freeform overshot-style patterns on a dobby loom.